Noa Yekutieli in front of her work

Track 16 got 2019 off to a stunning start with artist Noa Yekutiel’s solo exhibition “Pedestal” which draws from both personal and archival documentation to explore the global enforcement and resistance toward the formation of historical narratives in her site-specific installation, now through March 2

Israeli-American artist, Noa Yekutieli, draws from both personal and archival documentation to explore the global enforcement and resistance toward the formation of historical narratives in her site-specific installation, Pedestal. The space of her first L.A. solo exhibition at Track 16 Gallery in DTLA, reveals Yekutieli’s signature paper cutting technique. Black strings of paper are a stand-in for time passing. The “stretching” of the paper reaches from the top to bottom of the destructive image seemingly upholding a weight it’s not strong enough to hold, as if time and space could collapse at any moment. Similar to our personal experiences, global history too has its ways of remembering and forgetting. There is a sense of leaving while holding on, parting but still connected.  
In the main space of the gallery, walls are flanked with silhouettes of Ancient Greek sculptures poised on various sized pedestals. The paper, a medium usually used as a surface on which to create narratives, is now the structure itself. The once heavy and massive sculptures are now but a ghost or shadow. Across the floor rubble, rocks, and building materials are broken apart, yet carefully arranged to create a path for viewers. By limiting the space, Yekutieli controls the point of view of the spectator, akin to the limited and singular view of history obtained through time passing. Probing the power dynamics of recorded history, Yekutieli intimates that for every object that represents our past there are many more untold narratives.

Source: Track 16

Photos: L.A. Art Documents